Safety & Security

Digital technology provides opportunities and challenges for human and data safety. War, peacekeeping and law enforcement will increasingly involve all sorts of data connections; government surveillance should balance reducing threats with preserving privacy and other civil liberties. Public and private organizations storing personal data require better protection against data intrusions. Vital institutions’ data require more robust shielding from saboteurs. Reliable, secure, high-capacity, energy-efficient data transfer and storage technologies are urgently needed. These and related societal challenges are addressed in programme line Safety & Security.

Academics that are working on finding solutions to societal challenges related to Safety & Security:

Expertise

Herbert Bos is full professor at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and leads the VUSec Systems Security research group. He obtained an ERC Starting Grant to work on reverse engineering and an NWO VICI grant to work on vulnerability detection. These and other systems security topics are still close to his heart. Other research interests include OS design, networking, and dependable systems. Herbert moved to The Netherlands after approximately four years at the Universiteit Leiden. Before that he obtained his Ph.D. from the Cambridge University Computer Laboratory, followed by a brief stint at KPN Research (now TNO Telecom).

Expertise

Professor of Public Administration, in particular the governance of infrastructures in the Policy, Organisation, Law and Gaming section. I am also the director of the TPM Graduate School, which is currently being set up. My current research focuses on a variety of topics, most notably the governance of infrastructures, internet security, high reliability organizations, and multi-actor networks. I lecture about these and other topics at Delft University of Technology and at the Netherlands School of Public Administration in The Hague, an institute providing executive education for Dutch public sector officials.

Expertise

Professor of Software Security and Correctness, Digital Security Group, Institute for Computing and Information Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen. My research concentrates on theoretical and practical aspects of security. On the theoretical side, my focus is on quantum logic and probabilistic computation, supported by an ERC Advanced Grant, see also the EfProb Python library for probabilistic computation. On the practical side, I’m interested in identity and privacy management, see eg. the IRMA project and video on attribute-based authentication, in security and privacy in personalised medicine (see the PEP technology), and in cyber security and intelligence and the broader societal aspects of computer security.

Examples

A body armour for software

“I was walking from the railway station to the VU campus, deep in thought about a problem a colleague was having. Then it struck me: I needed to view the problem from a totally different angle.” A new method for securing computer programs against cybercrime was born, to help prevent attacks such as the recent hacks on KPN, LinkedIn, banks and governments.” Herbert Bos, Professor of Systems and Network Security, is developing systems to protect software against cyberthieves and other criminals.
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The debate on Cybercrime

'For every dollar in the pocket of a cybercriminal, we spend sometimes 1,000 or even 10,000 dollars at preventing that crime, that money would be much better spend at catching and prosecuting the criminals’, says Michel van Eeten, Professor of Governance of Cybersecurity.
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Bart Jacobs puts digital security on the agenda

Jacobs not only highlights errors that make software vulnerable – he also shows how software can be made more secure. One example of this is the improved version of the anonymous ‘OV’ (public transport) chip card that came into use in 2011. Radboud Computer scientists helped to make it, after having pointed out the weak points of an earlier design a few years earlier. Similarly, Jacob’s group made a super-secure chip for the DigiD identification card in 2013.
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